TriDot_020217_Blog

3 Steps for Getting Over a Bad Workout

If an athlete tells you that they haven’t ever had a bad workout, they’re lying. Let’s be honest; it happens. Don’t let a poor workout derail you. Here’s what to do instead: 1. Be Reflective Okay. It didn’t go well. So let’s look at what might have caused the “bump in the road.” Look back at your previous workouts, last few nights of sleep, and recent nutrition. If you can identify factors that interfered with your workout, you might be able to make adjustments so that it doesn’t happen again. Can’t seem to pinpoint the cause? Still keep record of it so that if a similar issue arises later in your training cycle you can analyze the days leading up…
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The Importance of Running Cadence in Triathlon Training

Beep, beep, beep, beep. Right, left, right, left. Beep, beep, beep, beep. I match my footfalls to the metronome app set to 180 bpm (beats per minute). Right, left, right, left, right, left.  Rats! I’m off again. Right, right, left, right, left, right—once again matching the beat and the constant beep of the metronome.  Right, left, right, left. Then I forget the beat altogether as I slow to a stop so that the neighborhood dog who thinks the metronome noise is an invitation to play chase understands that I am not here to play. I’ll admit, I don’t enjoy running with the metronome. I don’t think that my neighbors appreciate it much either. But I recently dedicated time and energy…
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Two Important Metrics for New Triathletes

Talk to an experienced triathlete and the conversation may soon lead into a discussion of stroke count, drag coefficients, intensity factor, and normalized power. While measuring and analyzing such factors can certainly be beneficial, it’s easy for new triathletes to become overwhelmed. As a new triathlete, you are still learning how to balance the training hours and gear involved with swimming, biking, and running. You don’t need to get “bogged down” with the finer details of training. Instead, here are the top two metrics to track for new triathletes: (Hint: If you’re new to triathlon, TriDot is specially designed to help you.) 1. Time Time is easily tracked by all athletes — even those who shy away from other forms…
TriDot_2016_0810_Blog

Triathlon Training and Foam Rolling: Good Idea?

Ah, the foam roller—that dense foam cylinder that you see in the athletic store or the gym.  You may have seen someone use it or maybe you have ventured to try it for yourself.  But if you are like most triathletes, you still shy away from the foam cylinder as you deem it unnecessary or uncomfortable. In that sense, foam rolling can be likened to stretching—something you should do but aren’t really sure if it’s worth the time or effort. Let me assure you, it’s worth the time! The success of your next triathlon training session can be greatly enhanced by your diligence in using the foam roller. Foam rolling can be an integral and important part of the recovery…
TriDot_2016_0805_Blog

3 Points to Keep Top of Mind for a Top Triathlon Experience

If you’re still early in your triathlon experience (and even if you’re not), there are three key points to always keep top of mind in trying to create a positive race day experience: 1. Open Water Swimming is Different than Pool Swimming Understandably, many new triathletes find open water swimming to be intimidating. When you go from a defined lap area with clear water and a solid black line for guidance to murky waters with hundreds of others around you, it’s bound to rattle nerves in even experienced triathletes.  One of my biggest pieces of advice to new triathletes: Practice open water swimming. It sounds so simple, but it’s amazing how many athletes begin an open-water swim triathlon without ever…
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Triathlon Training Journals: Be a Student of You

Are you making progress in your triathlon training? It seems like a simple yes/no question, but I am always surprised by the number of athletes who aren’t sure if they are making progress. Furthermore, if an athlete responds that they are making progress, they often struggle with my follow-up question—how do you know? I encourage all athletes, regardless of sport or experience, to keep a written record of their training and athletic achievements. Keeping a written record allows for one of the most valuable processes in athletics: self-reflection. Keeping a written record, whether it be a paper journal, calendar, or online training record, allows the athlete to become a student of their training. Athletes should look back at their previous…
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Using Pickle Juice for Triathlon Training and Racing

Pickle juice? Yes, you read that correctly! Pickle juice could be that magical piece of your triathlon training and racing nutrition that is missing right now.  When describing the nutrition strategy I used during Ironman Wisconsin, I typically get the most questions about my consumption of pickle juice: You really drank that? How did you carry it with you? Why pickle juice? Did it really work? Let me enlighten you. Yes, I really drank it. I drank 2.5 ounces at mile 40 of the bike course, 2.5 ounces at mile 80 of the bike course, and another 2.5 ounces at mile 13 of the marathon portion.  While some athletes opt to carry a small amount of the juice from the…
TriDot_2016_0523_Blog

You Can Fuel Your Triathlon Better with UCAN – Part 2

You may have heard Gastrointestinal (GI) distress can plague athletes. Perhaps you’ve even fallen victim to it yourself. Maybe intense heartburn ruined your training run. Or maybe worse, indigestion was the detrimental factor on race day. GI distress is commonplace for many athletes—particularly endurance athletes that are fueling during exercise or racing. Marathon legend, Bill Rodgers, said, “More marathons are won or lost in the portable toilets than at the dinner table.” This illustrates the prevalence and severity of the issue for many long-course racers.  In fact, a 2009 study conducted for the Opinions in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care found that roughly 50% of runners experience GI problems. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Indigestion, diarrhea, heartburn,…
TriDot_2016_0517_Blog

How a Medical Breakthrough Led to a Triathlete Nutrition Breakthrough – Part 1

A young Connecticut family faced overwhelming emotion when doctors diagnosed their son, Jonah, with a metabolic disorder.  This rare condition prevented Jonah’s body from converting stored carbohydrates (glycogen) into energy (glucose). To maintain adequate blood-sugar levels, Jonah needed to be fed with a feeding tube every two hours.  These feedings included the nighttime hours, preventing Jonah (and his parents) from ever getting a full night’s sleep. Determined to improve Jonah’s quality of life, his parents led research that resulted in the scientific breakthrough of SuperStarch, a complex carbohydrate that steadily releases glucose.  This slow release enables a body to maintain steady blood-sugar levels for hours.  While this scientific discovery had, most importantly, a positive life-changing impact for Jonah, the family…
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3 Steps Toward More Effective Triathlon Training Recovery

“Anyone can work hard. Do you have the discipline to recover?” – Lauren Fleshman, U.S. champion in the 5000 meters, 2006 and 2010. After finishing a beast of a workout where you hit all of the intervals and managed to keep your pace despite fatigue, your mental confidence should be high and you should be another step closer to reaching your goal. And you will be – if you recover correctly. Sadly, many athletes do not understand that without proper recovery their grueling sessions are doing more damage than good. After a tough training session, your body is in a fatigued state. You have broken down tissues and muscles, and your energy stores are depleted. The following three steps will…

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