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Triathlon Cycling: Pedaling Technique – Part II

In Part I of our post on triathlon cycling: pedaling technique, I discussed the differences between toe down and heel down and, with all other things being equal, the lack of advantage one has over the other. Today we’ll look at the implementation of toe down or heel down when cycling on flats vs. climbs as well as the pedaling technique known as ‘ankling.’ First, it’s important to note that you will pedal differently depending on your cadence. It’s widely known that the faster your cadence is, the less likely you’ll be able to control any sort of pedaling technique. This makes sense. High cadence usually equates to high effort. And as Steve Hogg illustrates from "Pedaling Technique – Which…
TriDot_090617_Blog

Triathlon Cycling: Pedaling Technique – Part I

Toe Down vs. Heel Down Pedal efficiency is a cycling nerd subject. We all know how to ride a bike but the triathlete who’s really dedicated really wants to know how to ride a bike. Really. Pedaling technique is an argument over how to be more efficient. Should you ride toe down? Heel down? Or somewhere in between? Through my research and experience, great cyclists and triathletes have accompanied all forms of pedaling techniques. The legends have run the full gambit of toe down, heel down, and average. So it only stands to reason that this kind of pedal technique is not necessarily indicative of your cycling prowess. Thus, I suppose we could technically just stop here and say it…
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Why Technical Cycling Matters in Triathlon – Part II

In my last post, I introduced why technical cycling matters to triathletes. The first reason I gave was that bike proficiency parallels power/speed consistency and greater overall energy conservation. The second reason, however, is even more important. And that’s because experience in technical riding makes you a safer athlete.   Safety First Yes, it’s true that Tour Riders are daredevils. They burn down mountains and zip around cut-throat turns in ways us mere mortals would never dream of – mostly because it’d be a nightmare. And while we do witness some pretty horrific crashes from time to time amidst the pro circuit, that’s usually only due to the fact these guys are in such close proximity to each other. The…
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Why Technical Cycling Matters in Triathlon – Part I

As triathletes, we prefer long, flat straightaways. That’s what our bikes were made for after all. Unfortunately, the real world isn’t always as conducive to how we’d prefer to ride. There are a multitude of race courses out there in the triathlon wilderness amok with sharp turns and wild descents. If you don’t know how to handle them you’ll be hindering your overall race performance and, even worse, potentially putting yourself in harm’s way. Technical cycling matters in triathlon and here’s why: AP = NP The less technical your cycling is, the harder it’s going to be to keep pace. For any event lasting over an hour (which last time I checked is virtually every triathlon in existence), it’s crucial…
TriDot_030717_Blog

3 Key Benefits of “Smart” Bike Trainers

Nowadays it seems everyone has a “smart” something. From smart phones to smart TVs to now even smart cars, our world is becoming all the more tech savvy as time goes on. Naturally, the triathlon and cycling nations have taken a privy to this smart revolution. And smart bike trainers are increasingly becoming all the rage. But what benefits can a smart bike trainer provide over the traditional trainer?   1. Playing with Power One of the more obvious reasons smart bike trainers have an advantage is the fact that they provide a power meter within—even if your bike doesn’t have one. And not only that, the higher end smart trainers output real power, not simulated numbers. Therefore, if you…
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What Type of Bike Do I Really Need for Triathlon?

As a seasoned triathlete and a coach, I’ve heard this question a lot. Often beginners want to know what kind of bike they should buy for triathlon. And my response is initially always the same (and not without my patented sense of snark): “A bike that fits.” But, of course, that’s another topic for another day. Others who have a few races under their belt want to know if what they’re riding is right for them. This is tricky because upgrading depends so much on your budget and your priorities. Therefore, the question can really only be answered on a case-by-case basis. However, one thing is universally true. A triathlon bike will always be faster than a road bike. Case…
TriDot_2016_1122_Blog

How is the Diaphragm and Breathing Relevant to Triathlon?

I think I can say with confidence that in 2014 I was the only pro triathlete on the IRONMAN circuit with slats of cardboard taped under his aero pads. “Cardboard?” you wonder? “Under where?” you ask. Yeah, I thought it was silly too. Why did I cut up pieces of cardboard and perform an arts and craft project on my triathlon bike? Because I was desperate to breathe. The wheezing was something I can only describe as borderline bronchitis. My position on my old triathlon bike was such that every ride would end in a persistent nagging cough. My breathing was hindered and surely my performance was as well. I was convinced that my diaphragm was resting in an unnatural…
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The Importance of Staying in Your Triathlon Bike Aero Position

There’s nothing quite like taking the Maserati out for a casual Sunday drive. That’s what I bought it for after all. You know, something to have so I can scope out the local Farmer’s Market. Something to slow things down. A car for the lighter things in life. Perhaps my purchasing decision sounds silly to you. And it should. You don’t buy a Maserati to go Sunday driving. You drive a car like that to go fast. Likewise, you don’t ride a triathlon bike to sit up and enjoy the scenery. Doing so defeats its purpose. You ride a tri bike to be aero. Saving time against the elements is what it was designed for. When you’re not in the…
TriDot_2016_0601_Blog

Three Power Threshold Training Points to Always Remember in Triathlon

Power threshold training, for the purpose of this blog post, is the training done on the bike in order to increase your Functional Threshold Power (FTP). FTP is the maximum sustainable power one can hold for a given amount of time. Increasing your FTP is perhaps the most important thing you can do for your cycling. An athlete with a higher FTP will be able to hold a faster pace more comfortably than an athlete with a lower FTP. For example, if Tim’s FTP is 225 watts and he’s holding 85% of that power for the bike leg of an IRONMAN, then Bill who weighs the same as Tim and has an FTP of 200 watts must hold a higher…
TriDot_2016_0412_Blog

How to Legally Draft on the Bike in a Triathlon

To those most intimate with the sport, drafting on the bike in triathlon is language to be feared. Draft-legal races – meaning the ability to draft behind others on the bike leg without penalty – are few and far between in the triathlon world, especially in the United States. However, the non-draft triathlon is a bit of a misnomer. Drafting on the bike is still legally available to all, albeit to a much lesser degree. This is due to the nature of USAT and WTC non-drafting rules for age group athletes. The USAT rulebook upholds that “no participant shall permit his drafting zone to intersect with or remain intersected with the drafting zone of a leading cyclist or that of…

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