TriDot_031517_Blog

Why Technical Cycling Matters in Triathlon – Part I

As triathletes, we prefer long, flat straightaways. That’s what our bikes were made for after all. Unfortunately, the real world isn’t always as conducive to how we’d prefer to ride. There are a multitude of race courses out there in the triathlon wilderness amok with sharp turns and wild descents. If you don’t know how to handle them you’ll be hindering your overall race performance and, even worse, potentially putting yourself in harm’s way. Technical cycling matters in triathlon and here’s why: AP = NP The less technical your cycling is, the harder it’s going to be to keep pace. For any event lasting over an hour (which last time I checked is virtually every triathlon in existence), it’s crucial…
TriDot_031017_Blog

Why a Nutrition Plan for a Half IRONMAN Triathlon Can’t Just be Doubled for the Full

Allow me to take the opportunity to spoil the plot of this article from the very beginning. Your nutrition plan for a full iron distance triathlon will be less than double what it would be for the half. There, you can leave now. However, for the inquisitive at heart let me digress as to why this is the case. Disclaimer: I will only be focusing on calorie consumption (and to a lesser degree carbohydrates) in discussing this topic. Your “triathlon nutrition plan” is a term painted by a broad brush. Glucose, liquid intake, sodium intake, protein, and so on could all have articles devoted to each topic separately. So for the sake of simplicity we will only concentrate on pure…
TriDot_030717_Blog

3 Key Benefits of “Smart” Bike Trainers

Nowadays it seems everyone has a “smart” something. From smart phones to smart TVs to now even smart cars, our world is becoming all the more tech savvy as time goes on. Naturally, the triathlon and cycling nations have taken a privy to this smart revolution. And smart bike trainers are increasingly becoming all the rage. But what benefits can a smart bike trainer provide over the traditional trainer?   1. Playing with Power One of the more obvious reasons smart bike trainers have an advantage is the fact that they provide a power meter within—even if your bike doesn’t have one. And not only that, the higher end smart trainers output real power, not simulated numbers. Therefore, if you…
TriDot_030217_Blog

The Top 3 Distractions in Triathlon Training

If there’s ever been a time to be distracted it’s here and now in the 21st century. Between smart phones, Twitter, and Netflix, our senses have been bombarded more than the dinosaurs in an asteroid shower. But even if you can manage enough focus to start your triathlon training, there are still distractions aplenty dedicated to veering you off course. These are the top 3 distractions in triathlon training to avoid.   1. Your Pace Typically pace is a positive thing, but every so often it can turn its back on you. In this case I’m using the term loosely. Here pace can mean average speed, minutes per mile, minutes per 100 yards, or power in watts. Now don’t get…
TriDot_022517_Blog

3 Key Points to Remember About Triathlon Swim Technique

I often relate swimming to the sport of tennis. To be truly great at tennis, it requires an elegant combination of incredible fitness and superior technique. However, one of these elements has much more value than the other. Guess which one? I’ll describe a tennis analogy to help explain why technique takes precedence. Say I had a one-on-one match with John McEnroe later today. If the match were to be decided by the more physically fit competitor, I would win hands down. I could run up and down the court all over bad boy McEnroe. He’s 57 years old, retired, and out of shape. I, on the other hand, am in my prime. But who do you think is going…
TriDot_022217_Blog

How Does Sodium Intake Relate to Hydration in Triathlon Training?

We all sweat water out of our bodies. However, did you know that key electrolytes—the most predominant of which is sodium—are also lost along with our sweat? Actually, the very definition of sweat by the National Institutes of Health website, Medline Plus, is “the release of a [salty] liquid from the body’s sweat glands.” Most triathletes in training are aware of this nowadays. But a few decades ago nearly everyone attempted to hydrate by simply guzzling down as much water as possible. Case in point: Jan Ripple’s (in)famous crawl at the 1987 Hawaii IRONMAN triathlon. As Torsten Abel describes on his blog, “She was leading until about mile 20 of the run until she collapsed, made the comment that she…
TriDot_021617_Blog

Why Corrective Exercises Are Important to Triathlon Training

Whether you swim like Michael Phelps, bike like Chris Froome, or run like Meb Keflezighi, one thing is clear: your form is not perfect. Even the greatest of athletes still have room for improvement, and they work on their weaknesses daily. In fact, that’s much of what separates top-tier triathletes from the mid-packers. It’s the attention to detail. While fitness is obviously important, superior technique is the other half of the triathlon training puzzle. What we mean by technique is the ability to move one’s body in a repeatable way with the greatest possible efficiency. Technically speaking, it’s often true that if you’re capable of repeating the process of an exercise in a superior manner to the next person, you…
TriDot_021017_Blog

5 Steps to Your Most Effective Triathlon Taper

My non-athletic roommate in college once claimed quite proudly, “Yeah, I’d go on a run with you, but I’m still tapering. It’s been a 10-year taper so I’m gonna be super-fast once it’s over.” Sadly I don’t think he understood the science nor the art of what tapering really is. Unfortunately, many triathletes are in a similar boat. We’re often guilty of equating tapering simply to the word “rest.” But rest can mean a lot of things to a lot of different people. For some, tapering is quitting training altogether before their A race (not smart). For others, it’s training at a consistent volume but going easy for every workout. For others still, it’s perhaps a guess, like skipping every…
TriDot_020717_Blog

Triathlon Training: What’s Really Required When It Comes to Protein?

Protein is a hot topic among triathletes these days. Hearsay and the wrong advice often flood the triathlon marketplace of ideas. Amidst the confusion, several questions regarding this subject demand answers. How much should I consume daily? Should I be consuming protein before my workout? During? After? What’s really required when it comes to protein? Let’s take one step back first. What exactly is protein anyway? Protein is one of the three macronutrients and is essential for building muscle mass. The other two macronutrients are carbohydrates and fat. Carbs provide the energy for our muscles. Fat does the same as a reserve along with protecting our overall body with much needed insulation. What’s been trending for the past decade or…
TriDot_020217_Blog

3 Steps for Getting Over a Bad Workout

If an athlete tells you that they haven’t ever had a bad workout, they’re lying. Let’s be honest; it happens. Don’t let a poor workout derail you. Here’s what to do instead: 1. Be Reflective Okay. It didn’t go well. So let’s look at what might have caused the “bump in the road.” Look back at your previous workouts, last few nights of sleep, and recent nutrition. If you can identify factors that interfered with your workout, you might be able to make adjustments so that it doesn’t happen again. Can’t seem to pinpoint the cause? Still keep record of it so that if a similar issue arises later in your training cycle you can analyze the days leading up…

Patents applied for in the U.S. and abroad. TriDot and the TriDot logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Predictive Fitness, Inc. in the US and other countries. Other trademarks include Optimized Triathlon Training, nSight, TrainX, RaceX, Physiogenomix, EnviroNorm, Normalized Training Stress, and Training Stress Profile. Additional Predictive Fitness trademarks can be found at www.predictive.fit/trademark-list.

Copyright © 2010-2021 Predictive Fitness, Inc. All Rights Reserved.